The Sanskari Girl Show: Unsanskari Boy Bharath Divakar Speaks His Truth



The Sanskari Girl Show engages with people who, against the sanskari odds, are living their truth. In this episode, we talk to Bharath Divakar, a spoken word poet from Bangalore, who shares his story of growing up gay in a Brahmin household.  

The Sanskari Girl Show engages with people who, against the sanskari odds, are living their truth. In this episode, we talk to Bharath Divakar, a spoken word poet from Bangalore, who shares his story of growing up gay in a Brahmin household.  

“You call me a fa**, homo, sissy.
You colour my love criminal red. You call the act of my existence invalid.”

“We stayed in a joint family. I am the only child of my parents and I grew up with my cousins. Sisters and brothers stayed together in a room. They were using their fathers’ shirts, taking their bikes, happily playing around and I played with them, too. This kind of hit me when I reached puberty. South Indian Brahmins have their own Sanskars and I had my thread ceremony at 14 years of age. I was given a big gyaan about how I should behave, what I should eat and what I should be. So, the next day, I went out with my friend to a dhaba and ate chicken and it was delicious! From then on, I have never looked back.”
His father had placed a sex education book as a gift for his birthday on his book rack. “I noticed it after a few days and was shocked to see the book. So, I went to my father and told him that I found this book. He said that he had kept it there and that it’s time to know about the topic as I was to reach puberty very soon.”
Coming out has been a very interesting part of his life. “During my times, we had to go to a cyber cafe to access the Internet. There was no way to understand the word ‘queer’. I knew that I was attracted to men but didn’t know the terms. During my post-graduation, I saw gay men who were married, or who were about to be married, having sexual relationship with others because there was no way of coming out. So it was the thought that stayed in my mind – that I should follow the same one day, get married to a girl and have sexual relationships with boys.” He was told to follow this ‘routine’ even by friends. “But, that meant living a lie, and I was not ready to do that.”

Listen in for more…



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